To Intercede Is To Love.

By: Ron Bouchard http://www.theburningheart.com

“So he is able to save completely those who come to God through him, because he always lives to intercede for them.  For it is indeed fitting for us to have such a high priest: holy, innocent, undefiled, separate from sinners, and exalted above the heavens.”       Hebrews 7:25,26

Perfect holiness, unapproachable Majesty.  This is the Holy One of Heaven.  Throughout history, men have cowered before the thrones of earthly kings.  Being called before an absolute ruler was not usually a good thing.  The commoner’s life was held at the whim of one man, seated on a throne of consolidated power.  And, as history teaches us, few of these rulers were of noble character.  Being brought before such a man was terrifying, considering the power he had over the lives of his subjects.  So, men would quite naturally give the king their utmost respect. 

In considering this, think of what it will be like to stand before the throne of the Creator of the Heavens and the Earth, the one called ‘The King of kings and the Lord of lords’.  Think of what it will be like for the person who has shaken his fist in defiance at God and has despised everything that the Holy One considers true and beautiful. That moment before that Throne will be a moment of abject terror such as one has never experienced before, when the realization dawns upon that person that they have spent their life, (given to them by God), defying Him.

But, the Word of God tells us that: “God is Love.” (1 John 4:8).  The Lord, who is unapproachably holy, the One who is completely undefiled by sin, has made a way for you and me to approach Him.  Indeed He has made a way for us to dwell with Him; even, amazingly, to be His children!

It is because He is Love that He has done this thing.  His glory is absolute just as His love is absolute.  In fact, His glory is His perfect love.

This is where intercession comes in.  To intercede.  This is the definition: “To plead on another’s behalf; To act as a mediator in a dispute; To intervene between two parties with a view to reconciling the differences.”  

Allow me to simplify and expand the definition from God’s viewpoint.  It means to stand in the gap and take the punishment that was meant for someone else; it means to take their place and allow the wrath against sin that was meant for the other person to be poured out on another in order to satisfy a Holy God. 

This is the other, Son of God.  This is Jesus.  This is what He freely chose to do out of His love for you and for me.  God’s perfect righteousness must be satisfied.  Rather than satisfy it by judging, condemning and punishing us, He chose to place all of these things upon His Son Jesus.  The Word of God says that: “He became sin who knew no sin, that, we might become the righteousness of God in Him!” (2 Corinthians 5:21)  This means simply, that Jesus took the guilt, shame and punishment for our sin upon Himself, that all who believe in Him may not perish but have everlasting life!  It is only by faith that we can receive this gift.  Even our faith is a gift of God.  All we have to do is ask!

And, please, always remember . . . He ever lives to make intercession for us!  That means today, at this very moment, if you have fallen into sin, Jesus is standing in the gap for you, showing His Heavenly Father that the price has been paid; that you are His purchased posession; that He will complete what He has begun in your life!

His blessed love upon you, Ron

Ron Bouchard. http://www.theburningheart.com

DISCLAIMER, AGAIN, JUST TO BE CLEAR

 

MY DEAR BLOGGER FRIENDS,

THERE ARE 2 THINGS I NEED TO MAKE CLEAR AGAIN.

FIRST POINT, NOT EVERYTHING I POST IS WHAT I STRONGLY BELIEVE IN, ALSO, THE POSTS THAT ARE MINE, ARE SIGNED AS,  LATER, PAT, CHILD OF GOD.

SECOND POINT, SOME OF WHAT I POST IS CONTROVENTIONAL SO I JUST WANT TO PRESENT DIFFERENT POINTS OF VIEW TO  YOU SOMETIMES. OUR MIND CONNECTED  WITH OUR HEARTS AND SOUL WILL BE STIMULATED BY THE HOLY SPIRIT TO SEE THE TRUE. AS WE READ THE BIBLE AND LEARN MORE ABOUT JESUS, WE WILL BE ALE TO DISCERN MORE BUT, MOST OF MY POSTS ARE FOR UPLIFTING ALL WHO READ AND HOPE THEY WILL TURN TO JESUS SOON. I LOVE YOU ALL AND I MEAN IT. I AM HERE FOR ANYONE THAT NEEDS PRAYERS OR TO TALK. YOU CAN EMAIL ME IF YOU WANT TO BE ANONYMOUS.

P.S. I sign all my personal posts the rest is my research

BE BLESSED,

LATER,

PAT,

CHILD OF GOD

Interview with John Piper

Founder & Teacher, desiringGod.org

Audio Transcript

Pastor John and I recorded a handful of episodes live and in person in Nashville this summer. And we ended our live recording session with an audience question about parenting non-Christian teenagers. Here’s the question and Pastor John’s response.

“We’ve got some really important, valuable emails from people in this room who are parenting non-Christian teenagers, teenagers who have not made a profession of faith. A number of questions have to do with enforcing church attendance. We heard from a woman named Angela who grew up going to Roman Catholic mass every Sunday. Her dad made her go. She started to resent Christianity. She later came to the faith, married a godly man, and is now involved in a wonderful church. But she looks back on that and wonders, as you’re parenting teens — especially in the mid- to late-teen years, and they have made no profession of faith, and don’t have any interest in the gospel or church — how much do you enforce church attendance? Where do you draw that line between expecting them to attend a church meeting on Sundays and being patient with them and not making Christianity come across as though it’s something being enforced upon them?”

Parent from the Womb

I can’t just jump in to 16-year-old, 17-year-old behavior without backing up a little bit. And I know that’s not the question being asked, but let me just say: We’re not God, and we do not create our teenagers completely — but partly we do. We start rearing teenagers when they’re in the womb — how we pray for them in the womb. We affect the behavior of a teenager when they’re 2 years old.

I watch a lot of young parents today. They seem to believe you cannot control the behavior of a child, or that it’s wrong to. The child makes an absolute mess or chaos of every relationship, every dinner meeting, every grocery store, and the parent seems powerless. That’s not helpful for teenagers. It’s coming, you know, 12 or 13 years later.

A little child needs to feel profoundly secure; profoundly loved, cherished, enjoyed; and profoundly under authority. And those are not contradictory, and every child knows it. Children want boundaries and massive love inside the boundaries. And so, there’s the setup that I would love to see happen, so that even when, at 14 or 15 or 16, a child starts to question and says finally, on one scary, awful night, “Daddy, I don’t believe this anymore; don’t think I ever did,” the structure of parenting at that point is such that they may not be a wild-eyed rebel against the family, but almost a brokenhearted rebel against the family.

Maybe. I mean, it’s all a continuum, right? We’ve got kids who are just viciously opposed to Mom and Dad for whatever reason, and others who are compliant but unbelieving. And what you do on that continuum in the middle is really difficult.

Love Relentlessly

You’ve got to avoid rage here, because I’ll tell you, everything in you will just collapse at that news. My child that I’ve invested in for 15 years has just told me that the most precious thing in my life is not precious to him. That’s just about as bad as it gets. That’s worse than death. It’s worse than death.

So they tell you, and you’ve got to avoid rage and dig in and try to draw out and listen with everything you’re worth, because stuff is going on that you don’t know. You do not know what’s going on in this kid. You don’t know what he heard at church. You don’t know what he heard at school. You don’t know how his friends are treating him. You don’t know anything because he hasn’t come forth, and you’ve got to patiently dig in, and then firmly resolve, “I’m going to love you no matter what. You’re my son, you’re my daughter, and I’m going to love you no matter what.”

Set Christian Standards

Then you say, “This is a Christian home. Mom and Dad set the tone here. Mom and Dad are the authority here, and this is a Christian home. We have Christian standards. We have Christian practices. While you’re part of this house, we don’t expect you to be fake. We’re not saying that the behavior we expect is a covering, a hypocritical covering for faith, so that you can look good to the world and make us look better. We want nothing to do with that kind of hypocrisy. We just want you to comply with these standards while you’re here. If by the time you’re ready to go, they’re not yours, we’re still going to love you. You’ll go and you’ll set your own pattern.”

And see what you can get. I mean, a kid who’s big and strong — I’m thinking boys now, because I had four boys and a girl — won’t go if he doesn’t want to go. He’ll just get in the car and drive away, or he’ll leave some other way. If they’re that rebellious, you can’t make them, but I think you should try. And you do it in a real, honest, face-to-face pleading. Give meaning to it:

Here’s what going to church would mean for you as an unbeliever with us on Sunday morning at age 15. Here’s what it would mean. It would mean “I respect my mom and dad. They brought me into this world. They invested in me for 15 years. They’re paying for my food and lodging. They’re probably going to help me go to college. I owe them some respect. They want me to go to church, then I’m going to go and sit there. And they know it doesn’t mean anything to me, and I know it doesn’t mean anything. And so does the pastor. And I’m there and the hope from my parents is that I’ll hear something that would lead me to Christ. My hope is that I can survive and get out of there as soon as possible.”

That’s the kind of negotiation you would do. But I will admit that there are going to be situations where you say to a 16-, 17-, 18-year-old son or daughter, “We do not have boyfriends or girlfriends over to sleep here in this house. We don’t do that. If you insist on that, you can’t live here.” So you will draw a line eventually.

God Has an Answer

But one of my pastoral strategies, and I’ve found it so helpful, is that people would come to me at the end of services with the most mind-boggling situations in life that I’d never even thought of, and I would generally see them conceiving of them in dualities: “This horrible thing or this glorious thing is going to happen. Help me decide how to navigate this.”

And I would say, “God is God, and he’s never shut into those two things. There’s always a third option.” I would say, “Let’s pray to see if something you’ve never even imagined could happen right here.” And we just pray together, because I didn’t have an answer for them. But God has an answer.

MY UTMOST FOR HIS HIGHEST

oiLook Again and Think

Do not worry about your life…  Matthew 6:25

A warning which needs to be repeated is that “the cares of this world and the deceitfulness of riches,” and the lust for other things, will choke out the life of God in us (Matthew 13:22). We are never free from the recurring waves of this invasion. If the frontline of attack is not about clothes and food, it may be about money or the lack of money; or friends or lack of friends; or the line may be drawn over difficult circumstances. It is one steady invasion, and these things will come in like a flood, unless we allow the Spirit of God to raise up the banner against it.

“I say to you, do not worry about your life….” Our Lord says to be careful only about one thing— our relationship to Him. But our common sense shouts loudly and says, “That is absurd, I must consider how I am going to live, and I must consider what I am going to eat and drink.” Jesus says you must not. Beware of allowing yourself to think that He says this while not understanding your circumstances. Jesus Christ knows our circumstances better than we do, and He says we must not think about these things to the point where they become the primary concern of our life. Whenever there are competing concerns in your life, be sure you always put your relationship to God first.

“Sufficient for the day is its own trouble” (Matthew 6:34). How much trouble has begun to threaten you today? What kind of mean little demons have been looking into your life and saying, “What are your plans for next month— or next summer?” Jesus tells us not to worry about any of these things. Look again and think. Keep your mind on the “much more” of your heavenly Father (Matthew 6:30). From My Utmost for His Highest Updated Edition

Bible in One Year: Exodus 16-18; Matthew 18:1-20