Women: Turn to the Wounded Healer for Help

  • Whitney HoplerCrosswalk.com Contributing Writer

Women: Turn to the Wounded Healer for Help

Are you struggling with something in silence – a tragic loss, a shattered dream, an illness, a betrayal?  Have you tried a quick fix, to no avail?  Are you hiding your brokenness from others for fear of what they might think if they discovered it?

Jesus experienced every kind of pain there is when He came down to Earth.  He was wounded and died on the cross for you, and He alone can heal you.  Don’t be afraid to turn to Jesus for help.  Once you know that He understands all you’re going through, you can trust Him to lead you to real, lasting change.

Here are some ways you can follow Jesus, the Wounded Healer, to the healing you need:

Know that God loves you no matter what.  Realize that nothing you’ve done or gone through can possibly cause God to love you any less.  Understand that you are His child and He loves you deeply.

Expect real healing to take time and effort.  Don’t waste your time looking for a quick fix for your healing, and don’t worry about people who tell you simply to “get over it.”  Realize that true, lasting healing most often comes about through a process rather than a one-time event.  Be willing to invest the time and energy God wants you to so you can grow beyond your struggles.

Be honest.  Don’t try to hide your pain from God or other people.  Realize that God already knows and understands what you’re going through, and that you don’t need to be afraid of what other people think.  Remember that everyone struggles in our fallen world, and know that many people will relate to what you’re going through and be willing to help you as you heal.  Allow yourself to the feel the pain from your wounds rather than pretending that they aren’t there.

Look at your snapshots of pain.  Think about the pivotal moments in your life that wounded you – snapshots of pain that helped shape you into the person you are today.  Once you identify them, ask God to shed His healing light on them so you can begin to deal with each one.

Look beyond your circumstances to God.  Know that no pain can come into your life unless God allows it for a good purpose, and that He will never let you suffer more than you can bear.  Realize that, even though we live in a fallen world, God is always faithful and good.  Make a list of the ways God has blessed you.  Go through your Bible to remind yourself of the awesome aspects of His character (loving, powerful, etc.).

Get rid of shame.  Know that, no matter what you’ve done, God still loves and accepts you as a person.  Ask God to give you the courage to face whatever parts of your past you’re keeping secret.  Realize that you don’t need to clean up your life to turn to God; He will meet you right where you are.

Combat lies with the truth.  Recognize that the voice of condemnation is never from God.  Realize that Satan is constantly trying to trip you up with lies meant to block your healing.  Whenever that happens, follow Jesus’ example and replace them with the biblical truths.  Memorize Scripture so it will come to your mind when you need it.  Practice putting on the “armor of God” mentioned in Ephesians 6.

Stop expecting anything or anyone but God to fulfill you.  Honestly consider whether you’ve been looking for ultimate satisfaction in the wrong places – through your work, through a relationship with another person, through an addiction, etc.  Realize that only God can truly fulfill you.  Decide to make God your top priority, trusting that by pursuing Him you will find real and lasting fulfillment.

Give your burdens to Jesus.  Imagine each of your burdens as a piece of heavy baggage that’s weighing you down.  Then, through prayer, leave each one at the foot of the cross, trusting in Jesus’ power to handle it for you.  After you do, write down what the Holy Spirit brings to your mind about your burdens and how you can become free of them.  You may also want to write a letter to God and read it aloud to Him.

Accept the mysteries of God’s decisions.  Acknowledge that God has His reasons for choosing to heal some people and not others.  Make peace with the fact that your circumstances may or may not change, according to God’s will.  But celebrate the fact that God will always be with you in the midst of your circumstances and heal your heart to enable you to overcome them.

Choose faith over fear.  Ask the Holy Spirit to give you the courage you need to keep following wherever God leads you in your healing journey.  Don’t be afraid to take the risks necessary to grow.

Look forward to the future.  Choose to believe that God has better days ahead for you.

Accept God’s grace and respond to it.  Think about all the ways God has blessed you that you don’t deserve.  In response, look for ways you can thank Him by making decisions to please Him.  Strive to make the rest of your life a “thank you” gift to God.

Forgive.  Ask others whom you have hurt to forgive you.  Rely on the Holy Spirit’s help to forgive people who have hurt you, so bitterness doesn’t poison your life and block your intimacy with God.  Remember that God can take the most evil act that someone else meant to harm you and turn it around to use it for good in your life.  Don’t wait until you feel like forgiving someone; decide to do so by aligning your will with God’s will, and the Spirit will help you through the process.

Seek support from wherever you need it.  Don’t hesitate to turn to your church, a professional counselor, a support group, or the medical community for whatever help you need.  Know that the spiritual, mental, and physical aspects of healing all can work together, and that God can choose many different avenues through which to heal you.

Serve others.  Remember that serving others takes your focus off your own problems and opens your heart to more healing.

Be patient.  Trust that God will bring the good work He has begun in you to its completion.

Ask God to use your experiences to help other people heal.  Tell others the story of how God healed you, and look for opportunities to encourage them as they seek healing for their own struggles.
Adapted from The Heartache No One Sees, copyright 2004 by Sheila Walsh.  Published by Nelson Books, a division of Thomas Nelson Publishers, Nashville, TN, www.thomasnelson.com.

BIBLE GATEWAY VERSE OF THE DAY

English Standard Version

 

Rejoice with those who rejoice, weep with those who weep.

 

Read at Bible Gateway

Read all of Romans 12

 

The Holy Bible, English Standard Version (ESV® Text Edition: 2016) Copyright ©2016 by Crossway Bibles, a division of Good News Publishers.

 

 

ESV MacArthur Study Bible

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English Standard Version

 

Rejoice with those who rejoice, weep with those who weep.

 

Read at Bible Gateway

Read all of Romans 12

 

The Holy Bible, English Standard Version (ESV® Text Edition: 2016) Copyright ©2016 by Crossway Bibles, a division of Good News Publishers.

 

 

ESV MacArthur Study Bible

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New King James Version

 

Rejoice with those who rejoice, and weep with those who weep.

 

Read at Bible Gateway

Read all of Romans 12

 

Copyright © 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc.

 

 

NKJV Comfort Print Full Color Study Bible

Buy Now

English Standard Version

 

Rejoice with those who rejoice, weep with those who weep.

 

Read at Bible Gateway

Read all of Romans 12

 

The Holy Bible, English Standard Version (ESV® Text Edition: 2016) Copyright ©2016 by Crossway Bibles, a division of Good News Publishers.

 

 

ESV MacArthur Study Bible

Buy Now

New King James Version

 

Rejoice with those who rejoice, and weep with those who weep.

 

Read at Bible Gateway

Read all of Romans 12

 

Copyright © 1982 by Thomas Nelson, Inc.

 

 

NKJV Comfort Print Full Color Study Bible

Buy Now

Toxic Envy

Thursday, May 28, 2020

GREG LAURIE

LISTEN  

“A sound heart is life to the body, but envy is rottenness to the bones.”

—Proverbs 14:30

I heard about a crab fisherman who would carry his catch around in an open bucket. When someone asked him if he was concerned about the crabs getting out he said, “No, the moment one of those crabs starts to climb out, the others reach up and pull him back down.”

It reminds me a lot of how kids can be. In their minds, everything has to be equal. If you give a gift to one of them they expect you to give it to the others. And if you allow one to do something they expect you to allow the others to do the same thing too.

Writing to the believers in Rome the apostle Paul said, “Let us walk properly, as in the day, not in revelry and drunkenness, not in lewdness and lust, not in strife and envy” (Romans 13:13 NKJV).

Maybe you’re saying, “I think I’m doing pretty well because I’m not living immorally. And I’m not drinking.”

Yes, but what about the rest of the verse? What about strife and envy? The term Paul used for strife refers to persistent contention, bickering, petty disagreement, and enmity. It reflects a spirit of antagonistic competitiveness that fights to have its own way.

It’s really the desire to prevail over other people. This is someone who can’t stand being surpassed and begrudges others’ success and position. It’s someone who always wants to be number one, the top dog. If you tell a story they’ll tell a better story. If you talk about an accomplishment they’ll have a better accomplishment, at least in their minds.

I’ve heard it said that envy shoots at another and wounds itself. We have to be very careful of this sin.

Don’t be like that. Instead, focus your energies on becoming more like Jesus Christ.

TRUTH FOR LIFE

t

Daily Update

May 28

Hear Today’s Program

Using Your Memory Well

This I call to mind, and therefore I have hope.

Lamentations 3:21

Memory is frequently the slave of despondency. Despairing minds remember every dark prediction in the past and expand upon every gloomy feature in the present; in this way memory, clothed in sackcloth, presents to the mind a cup of bitter-tasting herbs.

There is, however, no necessity for this. Wisdom can readily transform memory into an angel of comfort. That same recollection that on the one hand brings so many gloomy omens may be trained instead to provide a wealth of hopeful signs. She need not wear a crown of iron; she may encircle her brow with a tiara of gold, all spangled with stars.

Such was Jeremiah’s experience: in the previous verse memory had brought him to deep humiliation of soul: “My soul continually remembers it and is bowed down within me”; but now this same memory restored him to life and comfort. “But this I call to mind, and therefore I have hope.” Like a two-edged sword, his memory first killed his pride with one edge and then slew his despair with the other.

As a general principle, if we would exercise our memories more wisely, we might, in our very darkest distress, strike a match that would instantaneously kindle the lamp of comfort. There is no need for God to create a new thing upon the earth in order to restore believers’ joy; if they would prayerfully rake the ashes of the past, they would find light for the present; and if they would turn to the book of truth and the throne of grace, their candle would soon shine as before.

Let us then remember the loving-kindness of the Lord and rehearse His deeds of grace. Let us open the volume of recollection, which is so richly illuminated with memories of His mercy, and we will soon be happy. Thus memory may be, as Coleridge calls it, “the bosom-spring of joy,” and when the Divine Comforter bends it to His service, it is then the greatest earthly comfort we can know.

t

INSTITUTE FOR CREATION RESEARCH

  DAYS OF PRAISE

dMay 28, 2020
The Good Pastor
“I am the good shepherd, and know my sheep, and am known of mine.” (John 10:14)

The Greek word used here for “shepherd” is the same as for “pastor.” The Lord Jesus, therefore, was saying, in effect: “I am the good pastor: the good pastor giveth his life for the sheep [that is, ‘for His flock’].” A good pastor is, thus, one who leads his flock into good pasture, who knows his flock, and who is known by his flock. A good pastor would even give his life for his flock (vv. 1-16).

However, this is not merely a term for the leader of a church congregation. The term and the concept are sufficiently broad to include all those individuals (teachers, military officers, parents, etc.) who have leadership responsibilities.

In all such cases, our guide and example is our good shepherd, our good pastor, our good leader—the Lord Jesus Christ. With this in mind, consider some of the other biblical references to our good shepherd: “Feed the flock of God which is among you, taking the oversight thereof, not by constraint, but willingly; not for filthy lucre, but of a ready mind; Neither as being lords over God’s heritage, but being ensamples to the flock. And when the chief Shepherd shall appear, ye shall receive a crown of glory that fadeth not away” (1 Peter 5:2-4).

Note also Hebrews 13:20-21: “Now the God of peace, that brought again from the dead our Lord Jesus, that great shepherd of the sheep, through the blood of the everlasting covenant, make you perfect in every good work to do his will, working in you that which is wellpleasing in his sight, through Jesus Christ; to whom be glory for ever and ever.”

Most every Christian, at least on occasion, must assume the function of a spiritual shepherd, and every Christian, always, is spiritually a sheep. The Lord Jesus is our good shepherd, and we do well to follow Him in all things. HMM

 

27 Things Jesus Said We Can Look Forward To