5 Forgotten Airlines Everyone Used to Love

Today, everyone looks for the best airline with the most reasonable price. Searches start with the main companies: United Airlines, Singapore Airlines, and Lufthansa, among others. What travelers may not know, however, is that many of these popular airlines are descendants of several great airlines that came before. Here are five forgotten airlines everyone used to love.

Pan American World Airways (Pan Am)

Pan American World Airways (Pan Am)

Credit: @pan.am

Pan American World Airways (Pan Am, as it is more commonly known) is not just the title of a fictional television series starring Christina Ricci. Pan Am is one of the most adored airlines of all time. Founded in 1927, it was a pioneer in the aviation industry, bringing popularity to jumbo jets and other aircrafts when no one else in the industry was really using them yet. It was also the first airline to begin using computerized systems for flight booking and reservation management. This airline was so beloved that, after it closed up shop in 1991, the Pan Am Historical Foundation was created, and it’s entirely devoted to archiving news about Pan Am and its historical significance.

Trans World Airlines (TWA)

Trans World Airlines (TWA)

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Trans World Airlines (TWA) was born to carry mail in 1920s. Under the funding of billionaire aviator Howard Hughes, which started in 1939, the airline quickly became much more than that. Deemed “the airline run by flyers,” it released sleek new airplanes (this time for carrying people, not just mail), and was one of the first airlines to receive a jumbo jet. Unfortunately, though, according to USA Today, the airline began to crumble in the ’70s, and was forced to file for bankruptcy in the ’90s. In 2001, it was bought out by American Airlines.

Eastern Air Lines

Eastern Air Lines

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Like Pan Am, Eastern Air Lines was founded in 1927. It was one of the Big Four Airlines in the 1930s, and was led by a World War I flying ace named Eddie Rickenbacker. For much of its run, it was the undisputed leader in flights between New York and Florida, so much so that it was said to hold a monopoly over this area. As time went on, though, more and more problems began to plague the airline, such as debt and labor disputes, until it went out of business in 1991. The airline was so beloved, though, that the 2000s saw many attempts to bring it back to life. The latest attempt was short lived. According to Airways Mag, the new Eastern Air Lines was forced to give up its Air Operator’s Certificate less than two years after restarting.

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Cimber Air

Cimber Air

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Created in 1950, this Danish airline was extremely successful and was renowned for its great service. It has been linked with several great airlines that are still in business today, such as Lufthansa and Scandinavian Airlines. In 2008, it was large and powerful enough to absorb parts of a bankrupt airline called Sterling Airlines, but this proved to be its downfall. Just four years later it, too, had to file for bankruptcy, and the run was effectively over. There was an attempt by Scandinavian Airlines to get it going again according to The Local, but this did not pan out either.

Gandalf Airlines

Gandalf Airlines

Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Gandalf Airlines is perhaps one of the funnest airlines to have been lost to time. This Italian airline, operated just outside of Milan, was created by Luciano Di Fazio, who just so happened to be a huge J.R.R. Tolkien fan. He so loved The Lord of the Rings that the Eye of Sauron was emblazoned on the seat covers on every flight, and the theme from The Hobbit was played in every cabin. Unfortunately, though, this airline was short-lived. It opened in 1998, but according to RunwayGirlNetwork.com, it saw a huge decrease in the cities it served starting in 2003, and went bankrupt by 2004. Perhaps one day Frodo can go on a quest to bring it back.

4 Incredible Bookstores in the U.S. You Need to Visit

What is it about a bookstore? Maybe it’s the hushed voices or the smell of paperbacks. Maybe it’s the quiet companionship of fellow book-lovers, each immersed in their own private world, as they flip through pages or read in cozy chairs. For all the bookworms out there, here are four incredible bookstores in the U.S. you need to visit.

Harvard Book Store, Cambridge, Massachusetts

Harvard Book Store, Cambridge, Massachusetts

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Across the street from the venerable red bricks of Harvard University sits the storefront of Harvard Book Store. An independent shop open since 1932, Harvard Book Store is unaffiliated with the university — if you’re looking for Harvard gear, head down the street to the Harvard Coop. But if you’re in the market for a local bookstore with intelligent staff and an impressive selection, then you’ve found the place.

The main floor is dedicated to best sellers, new fiction and non-fiction, in addition to writing supplies like stationery, journals and fine pens. For used books, head down the stairs at the front of the store. The basement is a veritable treasure trove, with everything from fiction to cookbooks, and you’re sure to find something affordable to take home.

1256 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA

Strand Book Store, New York, New York

Strand Book Store, New York, New York

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New York’s Strand Book Store has been open for an impressive 92 years. Considered a New York literary institution, Strand was opened by a Lithuanian immigrant, Benjamin Bass, who saved and borrowed a total of $600 dollars to open the shop in Greenwich Village.

Today, the store still remains in the Bass family. The only remaining store on “Book Row,” Strand boasts “18 miles of books,” which comes out to an impressive 2.5 million in paperbacks and hardcovers. Filled with endless stacks and shelves of new and used books, Strand has just about any type of book you’d like to get your hands on. Plus, the top floor holds the rare book room and has the best seating, if you’re looking to curl up and get cozy for an afternoon.

828 Broadway, New York, NY

The Last Bookstore, Los Angeles, California

The Last Bookstore, Los Angeles, California

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A proud L.A. establishment, The Last Bookstore is more than a new-and-used book shop — it also contains a record store, a curio shop and a number of Instagram-worthy art installations. From the famous book tunnel to the photo-friendly book loop, this bookstore is fun and experiential. It also has the feel of a community gathering space, with numerous comfy couches for reading and conversing, and events lined up for months. The store also welcomes books, CDs, DVDs and records to sell or trade, and of course, book donations are always welcome. Just be forewarned, they do not permit large bags or backpacks inside the store.

453 S. Spring St, Los Angeles, CA