The Quick and the Dead

“And he commanded us to preach unto the people, and to testify that it is he which was ordained of God to be the Judge of quick and dead.” (Acts 10:42)

This is the climax of the first Christian sermon to the Gentiles delivered by Peter in the house of the Roman centurion, Cornelius. Peter emphasized the truth that Jesus was not just the promised Messiah of Israel, but that “he is Lord of all” (Acts 10:36), and that it is He alone who will judge the “quick and dead.”

This striking phrase occurs only three times in the Bible, each time denoting that Christ is Judge of all men. Paul wrote to Timothy as follows: “I charge thee therefore before God, and the Lord Jesus Christ, who shall judge the quick and the dead at his appearing and his kingdom; Preach the word” (2 Timothy 4:1-2). Peter wrote concerning the gross Gentile sins from which his readers had been delivered: “[They] shall give account to him that is ready to judge the quick and the dead” (1 Peter 4:5).

The term “quick” is the same as “living.” When Christ returns, “the dead in Christ shall rise first” (1 Thessalonians 4:16), and then all believers, including those still alive in the flesh at His coming, “must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ” (2 Corinthians 5:10). This will be the judgment of the “quick.” All the saved are alive in Christ at “the resurrection of life.”

But He must also judge the dead—that is, those who are “dead in trespasses and sins” (Ephesians 2:1) at “the resurrection of damnation” (John 5:29), “For the Father . . . hath committed all judgment unto the Son” (John 5:22). “And I saw the dead, small and great, stand before God . . . and they were judged every man according to their works. . . . This is the second death” (Revelation 20:12-14). HMM

From The Institute For Creation Research

Dealing With Pain, Day 7

Bible Gateway

Today’s reading is drawn from Revelation 21:1-5.

Our tears and pain were never part of God’s original plan for us, nor will they be part of eternity. However, we live in a sort of parenthesis in the timeline of the universe, a “present age” (see Mark 10:30) between the garden (see Genesis 2:8) and the new heaven and new earth (see Revelation 21:1).

At the end of time, God will wipe away every tear (see Revelation 21:4). We will not experience this suffering forever. But during these present times, we see the results of sin’s contamination of the world: death, mourning and pain. We fail and let ourselves and others down. Others do the same. Instead of denying these negative aspects of our present life, we need to accept and deal with them in preparation for the time when God ends all the suffering. The Bible teaches us three keys that can help: forgiveness (see Ephesians 4:32), grief (see James 4:9) and healing (see Psalm 30:2). We must arm ourselves with these three things. They will help us grow, recover and move past the difficult times. The good news is that the pain is not the end of the story. God will give us current healing and future paradise. Our job is to be involved in the journey with him.

The Parable of the Persistent Widow, Day 14

Today’s reading is drawn from Luke 18:1-8.

Because of ongoing injustice, the presence of the Romans in Israel and the corruption of some of the Jewish leadership, it must have seemed to Jews in the first century as if God would never intervene. The same questions must have also weighed on the early church as they too suffered hardship and injustice.

What did this parable teach you about justice?

 

Bible Gateway