Why Should I Bother to Seek and Offer Forgiveness?

Larry White

Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Forgiveness is a rather large topic covered in the Bible. You could read the Bible from cover to cover and come to the conclusion that it is all about forgiveness. There are layers to the conversation on forgiveness though. There is the forgiveness that we must receive from God because of our sin. This is what we often think about for this topic. However, the Bible also shows us that directly tied to the forgiveness of our sin is our willingness to forgive when our relationships with each other are harmed in some way. Forgiveness is essential if we are going to grow as children of God.

Photo credit: Unsplash/Jacob Postuma

What Is Forgiveness?

Consider forgiveness through the idea of debt. When we take out a loan, the way it is forgiven is when we pay the money we borrowed back along with some extra money as interest. If we miss a payment, further debt is incurred and it becomes increasingly difficult to pay off the original amount. Somewhere along the way, the debt can be referred to a debt collector. These are people who use not so nice tactics to collect what is owed. Once we do find a way to pay off the debt of the loan, it is considered forgiven.

In our relationships with each other, we often see them in terms of debt transactions. Someone does something for me so I “owe” them one and vice-versa. When someone does something that hurts me (mentally, physically, socially, or spiritually) I consider that in the form of a debt, but now I am charging interest. We start to make decisions about our interactions with that person based on this debt and we treat them with different levels of hostile behavior depending upon the severity of the infraction. This is when we have become not just the person owed something, but also the debt-collector.

Oddly enough, the people we treat this way may not even know that what they did has caused offense. So, the reality here is that we increase the stress and anxiety within ourselves while the other person may not be experiencing it at all. There is a quote that has been attributed to many, many wise people that says “resentment is like drinking poison and waiting for the other person to die.” This speaks to the toxic effect that stress, anger, and anxiety has on us when we refuse to forgive.

Forgiveness is the route that allows us to let go of that toxicity. Lack of forgiveness is about trying to maintain some semblance of power within our identity. It has the opposite effect; it changes us into something bitter, twisted, and enslaved. God has designed us to be something better – something glorious, beautiful, and free. We created the debt in our mind; we can write off the debt and let go of the shackles that tie us to our resentment. Additionally, God would like us to move into a state of being that is beyond understanding our relationships in terms of debt transactions. God wants us to see each other in terms of grace (a gift).

Photo credit: ©Getty Images/Andrey Popov

What Does the Bible Say about Forgiveness?

There are a great many Bible verses about forgiveness. Let’s look at a few that speak about people forgiving people.

Proverbs 10:12 – “Hatred stirs up strife, but love covers all offenses.”

Proverbs 17:9 – “Whoever covers an offense seeks love, but he who repeats a matter separates close friends.”

Genesis 50:19-21 – “But Joseph said to them, ‘Do not fear, for am I in the place of God? As for you, you meant evil against me, but God meant it for good, to bring it about that many people should be kept alive, as they are today. So do not fear; I will provide for you and your little ones.’ Thus, he comforted them and spoke kindly to them.” (Note: Joseph is forgiving his brothers that had sold him into slavery in Egypt where he had suffered for quite a few years.)

Mark 11:25 – “And whenever you stand praying, forgive, if you have anything against anyone, so that your Father also who is in heaven may forgive you your trespasses.”

Luke 17:3-4 – “Pay attention to yourselves! If your brother sins, rebuke him, and if he repents, forgive him,  and if he sins against you seven times in the day, and turns to you seven times, saying, ‘I repent,’ you must forgive him.”

Ephesians 4:32 – “Be kind to one another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, as God in Christ forgave you.”

Colossians 3:12-13 – “Put on then, as God’s chosen ones, holy and beloved, compassionate hearts, kindness, humility, meekness, and patience, bearing with one another and, if one has a complaint against another, forgiving each other; as the Lord has forgiven you, so you also must forgive.”

Photo credit: Pexels/wendyvanzyl

What Does Jesus Say about Forgiveness?

Jesus himself stressed the importance of forgiveness, but he was doing so in a culture that stressed very legalistic ideas. The problem with legalism is that it forgets or bypasses the spirit in which the (Mosaic) law was given. Forgiveness from a legalistic perspective is a matter of balancing the books and making sure that a debt is paid or cancelled. From a spiritual perspective, forgiveness is about restoring the pathways of communication and love.

Look at Matthew 18:15-22 as an example. In verses 15-20, Jesus lays out a conflict resolution process that seeks a state of forgiveness between the parties involved. The ideal result of this solution is the meeting of two (or more) people seeking a state of forgiveness, and Jesus says that he is there also. What a beautiful moment that people can share not only with each other, but with God. Where else can we specifically do something and know that God joins us in that moment? Seen in this light, forgiveness is sacramental.

Peter hears Jesus give this instruction, but his legalistic side kicks in and he asks in verse 21 how many times he has to forgive someone before he can write them off. Seven times?

Seven represented completion in the Bible. Peter wanted to know at what point he could be completely done with someone that constantly seemed to need forgiveness. If we are honest, we all have been here. There is someone that you know who always seems to have a knack for doing something that wrongs you. It is very likely that you have already written them off and avoid them as a matter of trying to preserve your own inner peace.

Jesus knows that these issues arise, but his instructions don’t let us off the hook so easily. He tells Peter in verse 22 that he must forgive the offender 70 times 7. That sounds like a high number (490), but it is still a number, right? We can go to 490 and then forever bar a person from our life because Jesus said this, correct? Sorry. What Jesus meant is tied to the numbers he gave. Seven represents the idea of completion. 70 as 10 times 7 is an expression of magnitude, not a specific number. This means that our responsibility to forgive goes far beyond what a legalistic world would consider complete. Forgiveness, like God’s love, has no end.

Photo credit: ©Getty Images/Kristi Linton

Why Does the Bible Command Us to Forgive?

As mentioned before, forgiveness allows us to become unentangled from toxic anxiety and stress so that we can become more of what God created us to be. Forgiveness is a non-negotiable practice for true followers of Jesus Christ and there is another reason besides the previous one. The forgiveness that we receive from God is tied to our forgiving others. Not our capability to forgive or our capacity to forgive, but our actual practice of forgiving others is something that God reciprocates by forgiving us.

The Bible mentions this is Mark 11:25 as well as the Lord’s Prayer (Matthew 6:9-13). In fact, Jesus further explains after the Lord’s Prayer that forgiveness on our part brings about forgiveness from God. Perhaps this is because as we forgive and release our desires for vengeance or control, we are releasing ourselves from deep-seated self-centeredness which allows God to have more influence and power in our lives. You can’t receive the blessings of God if you are full of the relics of your old self.

Are there exceptions? The Bible shows that Jesus commands us to continually forgive those who repent and seek our forgiveness (Matthew 18:21-22 ; Luke 17:3-4). There is a verse where there is a different recourse, but it needs to be understood correctly.

In Matthew 18:15-20 Jesus outlines a conflict resolution process where forgiveness is the preferred outcome. However, there is recognition that it may not be possible. Verse 17 states “If he refuses to listen to them, tell it to the church. And if he refuses to listen even to the church, let him be to you as a Gentile and a tax collector.” This is not a license to hold a grudge. The Jews were not allowed to interact with the unclean in any way. What Jesus is saying here is that on the strict condition that someone does not repent of what they have done, then and only then, you should cut off any contact with them.

This means that you will need to release any ideas of debt or connection to them as well as the dictate to have no contact with them. It is a severance without malice for the protection of your own soul as well as the unity of the body of the church. Again, this is not an allowance for malice or expectation of vengeance. It is for protection until such time as a person will repent and seek forgiveness.

Photo credit: ©Getty Images/Paffy69

How Do We Forgive Someone?

There is no magic formula that allows us to forgive. We must set it as a goal and continue to strive for it. A good place to start is how the Bible tells us to remember that the other person is just as guilty of sin as we are (Ephesians 4:32Colossians 3:12-13). Our sin separates us all from God and knowing that can give us a better perspective.

Perhaps a good way to start on the path toward forgiving someone is to pray that God would allow you to see them like HE sees them. Remind yourself that Jesus cherished them enough to die for them as well as you. Let God break your heart for them and thereby heal you of your hurt from their hand. I am not suggesting that you should do this in a way that allows yourself to be in an abusive relationship or create an unsafe situation for your children (as can happen). If that type of thing continues, the offender has not repented and the rule regarding severance should be applied. God did not create you or anyone else to suffer abuse from another.

If you are the one in the wrong, how do you seek and accept forgiveness? Matthew 5:23-24 says this: “So if you are offering your gift at the altar and there remember that your brother has something against you,  leave your gift there before the altar and go. First be reconciled to your brother, and then come and offer your gift.”  God wants you to have clear and honest relationships here on earth. To seek forgiveness, you must as gently as possible confess your offense to the person you offended and share with them that you are not going to do that anymore. When they understand that, apologize and then ask if they would forgive you.

I am not promising that this will happen instantly, healing can take time depending on what the offense was and how badly someone was hurt by it. Our friends from Alcoholics Anonymous recommend as part of seeking forgiveness, that we make sure that in seeking forgiveness we do not cause further damage to someone. It may take time before it is wise for you to seek forgiveness from someone or you could make the issue worse. During your wait, pray to God for the opportunity of healing and restoration.

Forgiveness, though not easy, is necessary. Without being able to forgive, we cut off our ability to be forgiven. God himself even cuts off the avenue of forgiveness if we cut it off from someone else. If you want to be everything that God has created you to be, then you need to be willing to enter into the dialog that bring forgiveness.

Photo credit: ©Unsplash/Christiana Rivers


Larry White is the Pastor of Community United Methodist Church in Marathon, FL and is also an Adjunct Professor at Florida Keys Community College teaching courses in World Religions and New Testament.

Meekness and Mourning

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Matthew 5:4–5 “Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted. Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth” (vv. 4–5).

Some translators render the Greek term for blessing (makarios) as “happy,” but this is not entirely accurate. Of course, happiness is often linked to blessing, but God’s favor brings far more than mere happiness. To be blessed by our Creator is to find His approval. God claims us as His child when He blesses us.

Jesus has said our Father approves of the poor in spirit — those who know their need for divine forgiveness (Matt. 5:3). This makes sense, for we are God’s people only if we come to the end of ourselves and turn to Him alone for salvation (Isa. 66:1–2; Luke 18:9–14; 1 John 1:8–9). In today’s passage, our Savior declares “blessed” those who mourn and those who are meek (Matt. 5:4–5).

Many think verse 4 refers to any mourner, but the context renders this view impossible. As the note in The Reformation Study Bible indicates, the second beatitude develops the first. Jesus describes here mourning over sin and its effect on the world. Believers feel sorrow for the ways they have offended God (Ps. 51:4) and for the ruin that mankind’s evil has brought to this earth (Dan. 9:1–19). Even Jesus weeps for Jerusalem because of what her sin brings upon her (Luke 19:41–44). Mourning is not constant despair or low self-esteem; these manifest a preoccupation with the self. True mourning over sin is focused Godward and finds comfort there, since the holiness of the Lord that reveals our desperation is joined with His grace, which offers forgiveness in the Gospel.

Christ also tells us God’s blessing, or approval, comes to the meek (Matt. 5:5). John Calvin offers the best description of meek people in his commentary. They are “persons of mild and gentle dispositions, who are not easily provoked by injuries, who are not ready to take offense, but are prepared to endure anything rather than do the like actions to wicked men.” Meek people do not lack assertiveness, nor are they wishy-washy. Moses was meek (Num. 12:3), but he was not weak or cowardly. Being meek means being aware of our limitations, enabling us to be gentle and good to others (James 3:13–18). When we are meek we understand that we are just as guilty before God as the next person, and we therefore find it difficult to hold grudges against those who offend us.

Coram deo: Living before the face of God

Meekness rejects any thought of self-sufficiency. It is antithetical to our aggressive, dog-eat-dog world that teaches people never to be satisfied with what they have and therefore to pursue more and more “stuff,” even if it means they lack the time to enjoy it. The meek inherit the earth because they have not seized their inheritance; they are content with God’s provision. What does your attitude towards your “stuff” say about your meekness?

For further study:

Psalm 37

The Bible in a year:

Numbers 2–3

View today’s reading at Bible Gateway

Mark 1:1-22

John the Baptist Prepares the Way

1 The beginning of the good news about Jesus the Messiah, the Son of God, as it is written in Isaiah the prophet:

“I will send my messenger ahead of you,
who will prepare your way”—
“a voice of one calling in the wilderness,
‘Prepare the way for the Lord,
make straight paths for him.’”

And so John the Baptist appeared in the wilderness, preaching a baptism of repentance for the forgiveness of sins. The whole Judean countryside and all the people of Jerusalem went out to him. Confessing their sins, they were baptized by him in the Jordan River. John wore clothing made of camel’s hair, with a leather belt around his waist, and he ate locusts and wild honey. And this was his message: “After me comes the one more powerful than I, the straps of whose sandals I am not worthy to stoop down and untie. I baptize you with water, but he will baptize you with the Holy Spirit.”

The Baptism and Testing of Jesus

At that time Jesus came from Nazareth in Galilee and was baptized by John in the Jordan. 10 Just as Jesus was coming up out of the water, he saw heaven being torn open and the Spirit descending on him like a dove. 11 And a voice came from heaven: “You are my Son, whom I love; with you I am well pleased.”

12 At once the Spirit sent him out into the wilderness, 13 and he was in the wilderness forty days, being tempted by Satan. He was with the wild animals, and angels attended him.

Jesus Announces the Good News

14 After John was put in prison, Jesus went into Galilee, proclaiming the good news of God. 15 “The time has come,” he said. “The kingdom of God has come near. Repent and believe the good news!”

Jesus Calls His First Disciples

16 As Jesus walked beside the Sea of Galilee, he saw Simon and his brother Andrew casting a net into the lake, for they were fishermen. 17 “Come, follow me,” Jesus said, “and I will send you out to fish for people.” 18 At once they left their nets and followed him.

19 When he had gone a little farther, he saw James son of Zebedee and his brother John in a boat, preparing their nets. 20 Without delay he called them, and they left their father Zebedee in the boat with the hired men and followed him.

Jesus Drives Out an Impure Spirit

21 They went to Capernaum, and when the Sabbath came, Jesus went into the synagogue and began to teach. 22 The people were amazed at his teaching, because he taught them as one who had authority, not as the teachers of the law.

New International Version (NIV)

Holy Bible, New International Version®, NIV® Copyright ©1973, 1978, 1984, 2011 by Biblica, Inc.® Used by permission. All rights reserved worldwide.

Outside the Comfort Zone – Greg Laurie Daily Devotion – February 18, 2020

Tuesday, February 18, 2020

Outside the Comfort Zone

“Yet I dare not boast about anything except what Christ has done through me, bringing the Gentiles to God by my message and by the way I worked among them.” (Romans 15:18 nlt)

Saul of Tarsus, later the apostle Paul, came from a good Jewish home and was very devout. He also was a member of the Sanhedrin, which was somewhat like the Jewish Supreme Court of the day. And he was a former student of the legendary rabbi Gamaliel. He had everything going his way.

So you would think that when he came to believe in Jesus that God would call him to bring the gospel to his fellow Jews. Instead, the Lord changed his name from Saul to Paul and gave him his primary mission of taking the gospel to the Gentiles.

God took Paul out of his comfort zone, calling him to go to people that he probably didn’t want to go to. Yet Paul embraced his mission with abandon and great passion. And his greatest joy was that people believed.

Writing to the Christians in Rome, he said, “Yet I dare not boast about anything except what Christ has done through me, bringing the Gentiles to God by my message and by the way I worked among them” (Romans 15:18 nlt).

Paul easily could have boasted about a lot of things, saying, “Hey, I’m Paul, the greatest theologian in all of history.” Or, “I’ve been to Heaven and have come back to earth. I was caught up into the third Heaven and saw glorious things.” While these things are true, Paul never said anything to that effect.

Instead, the apostle boasted in the fact that God had allowed him to share the gospel and lead people to Jesus Christ. And he saw them completely changed by Jesus.

Paul understood that his calling was to tell people about Jesus, to seek to lead them to Christ, and to get them on their feet spiritually. And by the way, that is our calling as well.

Copyright © 2020 by Harvest Ministries. All rights reserved.

For more relevant and biblical teaching from Pastor Greg Laurie, go to www.harvest.org
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A Word with You – February 18, 2020

Going Not Knowing

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Mystery rides were part of growing up at our house. Usually it was a Sunday afternoon, and I’d pile our three kids, who were little then and never will be again, into our car for a ride. I think we explored every corner of our area. And as we did, we discovered over the years, a lot of great things. But I’ve got one son who’s a lot like me. He wants to know the plan before we leave.

“Hey, Dad, where are we going? Where are we going to eat? What are we going to eat? What are we going to do while we’re there? How long will we be there? What time are we going to get home?” He would pump me with questions; I felt like I was being interrogated by a police sergeant. Sometimes I knew it was better not to explain where we were going. Oh, we’ve done things that would have sounded boring if I had told about them, but they turned out to be exciting and I knew they would. Plus surprises are fun anyway. So, my kids got used to hearing two words when we were about to begin a mystery trip, “Trust me.” I don’t think I let them down. It was good training for journeys with their other Father.

© (c) Ronald P. Hutchcraft
Distributed by Ron Hutchcraft Ministries, Inc.

Learn how to begin a personal, love-relationship with the God who made you.

Taking the Initiative Against Drudgery

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Arise, shine…  Isaiah 60:1

When it comes to taking the initiative against drudgery, we have to take the first step as though there were no God. There is no point in waiting for God to help us— He will not. But once we arise, immediately we find He is there. Whenever God gives us His inspiration, suddenly taking the initiative becomes a moral issue— a matter of obedience. Then we must act to be obedient and not continue to lie down doing nothing. If we will arise and shine, drudgery will be divinely transformed.

Drudgery is one of the finest tests to determine the genuineness of our character. Drudgery is work that is far removed from anything we think of as ideal work. It is the utterly hard, menial, tiresome, and dirty work. And when we experience it, our spirituality is instantly tested and we will know whether or not we are spiritually genuine. Read John 13. In this chapter, we see the Incarnate God performing the greatest example of drudgery— washing fishermen’s feet. He then says to them, “If I then, your Lord and Teacher, have washed your feet, you also ought to wash one another’s feet” (John 13:14). The inspiration of God is required if drudgery is to shine with the light of God upon it. In some cases the way a person does a task makes that work sanctified and holy forever. It may be a very common everyday task, but after we have seen it done, it becomes different. When the Lord does something through us, He always transforms it. Our Lord takes our human flesh and transforms it, and now every believer’s body has become “the temple of the Holy Spirit” (1 Corinthians 6:19). From My Utmost for His Highest Updated Edition

Bible in One Year: Leviticus 25; Mark 1:23-45

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beautyinspiration4.wordpress.com/

Growing until excellence looks normal!

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True.living

Nuturing a safe space for heart to heart conversation, with the end goal of healing and living a full life.

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beautyinspiration4.wordpress.com/

Growing until excellence looks normal!

Discover

A daily selection of the best content published on WordPress, collected for you by humans who love to read.

True.living

Nuturing a safe space for heart to heart conversation, with the end goal of healing and living a full life.

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